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Mammoths: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.7 [CCSS page]

Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.

Suggested Lesson

As a class, and using the knowledge of the human body, identify the body parts of a mammoth using this illustration found here.

Third Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.1 [CCSS page]

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.

Suggested Lesson

Read here about what causes animals to become endangered and later, extinct. After reading, share your opinion in writing about why we no longer have mammoths on the earth today. What caused their extinction? Provide details to support your argument.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.9 [CCSS page]

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Suggested Lesson

Research two different species of mammoth and create a comparison chart about the two. How were they similar and what made them different? The Absolute Elephant Information Encyclopedia is a great website that may be helpful. Varying species are listed in the left column of that page.

Math

Second Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.A.1 [CCSS page]

Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.

Suggested Lesson

Do some research on mammoth sizes. Then recreate on paper the size of a whole mammoth from ground to shoulder or just the size of their tusks.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.B.4 [CCSS page]

Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units - whole numbers, halves, or quarters.

Suggested Lesson

Using this Mammoth Migration Map, transfer it to a larger world map. Calculate the distance that mammoths traveled in a migration.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.5.NBT.B.6 [CCSS page]

Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

Suggested Lesson

The woolly mammoth lived a long time ago. Check out this Tale of the Woolly Mammoth to determine how long ago that was. Then determine how many of their own (student) lifetimes (using their current age) that would amount to.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1[ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

All animals need food in order to live and grow. All living things need water.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need.

Second Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-2-1 [ICS page]

Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.

Supporting Content:

Some events happen very quickly; others occur very slowly, over a time period much longer than one can observe.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Supporting Content:

Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes.

Life Sciences: LS2-3-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Supporting Content:

The environment also affects the traits that an animal develops. Some characteristics result from individuals' interactions with the environment.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Supporting Content:

Animals have various body systems with specific functions for sustaining life: skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, muscular, digestive, etc.

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met.

Earth and Space Structures: ESS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers for changes in a landscape over time to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

Supporting Content:

Local, regional, and global patterns of rock formations reveal changes over time due to earth or other forces.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago.

Supporting Content:

Some kinds of plants and animals that once lived on Earth are no longer found anywhere. Fossils provide evidence about the types of organisms that lived long ago and also about the nature of their environments. Examples of data could include fossils of extinct organisms.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.

Supporting Content:

The collection of fossils and their placement in chronological order is known as the fossil record and documents the change of many life forms throughout the history of the Earth.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-2 [ICS page]

Apply scientific ideas to construct an explanation for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms to infer relationships.

Supporting Content:

Anatomical similarities and differences between various organisms living today and between them and organisms in the fossil record enable the classification of living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize Earth's history.

Supporting Content:

The geologic time scale interpreted from rock strata provides a way to organize Earth's history. Examples of Earth's major events could range from being very recent (such as the last Ice Age or the earliest fossils of homo sapiens) to very old. Examples can include the evolution or extinction of particular living organisms.

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