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Mountain Goats: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

First Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.1.1c [CCSS page]

Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.

Suggested Lesson

Have a guest speaker bring in a domesticated goat and talk about them. Students can ask questions to compare domesticated goats to mountain goats or to clarify details about goats in general.

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.1 [CCSS page]

Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

Suggested Lesson

Before beginning your unit on mountain goats, have students each generate a question about them. When you have finished studying them, have students answer their own question or trade and have students answer someone else's question.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3 [CCSS page]

Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Suggested Lesson

Research hooved animals and compare 2-3 different species. Create a Venn diagram for your comparison. Here is a 2 circle Venn, and here is a 3 circle Venn to print.

Math

First Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.¹

Suggested Lesson

Using a piece of graph paper as the mountain, get the mountain goat to the top first. Roll the dice once to get the goat to move forward. On your next turn, roll just one of them and subtract as the goat retreats to get water or food. On the next turn roll both dice and move forward again. Play in pairs or in small groups.

Second Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.¹

Suggested Lesson

How much is the word "mountain goat" worth, when the letters have different values, e.g., a=50, b=100, c=150, and so on? Change up the values to create new problems.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.NBT.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

Suggested Lesson

Before doing this activity, preselect values for each of the parts of the mountain goat. This could be done by the teacher, or as a group effort. Give each student a copy of this printable. Students roll dice, placing the values into columns for place value until they reach the preselected value. When they arrive at a number that can be rounded to one of the preselected values, that part of the goat anatomy gets colored. Be the first to get all parts colored. For a basic version, allow students to work on only one part at a time, color it and then move to another part. For a challenge and a bit of strategy, students can choose which roll of the dice goes to which part of the anatomy.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1[ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

Examples of patterns could include that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals. Animals obtain their food from plants or from other animals.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need. Plants, animals, and their surroundings make up a system.

First Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-1-1 [ICS page]

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, protect themselves, move from place to place, and seek and take in food.

Life Sciences: LS1-1-3 [ICS page]

Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Supporting Content:

Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Changes animals go through during their life form a pattern.

Second Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats

Supporting Content:

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land. The emphasis is on the diversity of living things in each of a variety of different habitats.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Supporting Content:

Being part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes. Groups may serve different functions and vary dramatically in size.

Life Sciences: LS2-3-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Supporting Content:

The environment also affects the traits that an animal develops. Some characteristics result from individuals' interactions with the environment.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Supporting Content:

Animals have various body systems with specific functions for sustaining life: skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, muscular, digestive, etc.

Life Sciences: LS1-4-2 [ICS page]

Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.

Supporting Content:

Different sense receptors are specialized for particular kinds of information, which may be then processed by the animal's brain. Animals are able to use their perceptions and memories to guide their actions.

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met. A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.

Supporting Content:

Populations of animals are classified by their characteristics. An example of cause and effect relationships could be animals that have better camouflage coloration than other animals may be more likely to survive and therefore more likely to leave offspring.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the animals and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of food and water, some animals survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS1-MS-3 [ICS page]

Use argument supported by evidence for how a living organism is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

Supporting Content:

In multicellular animals, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues. Tissues form organs that are specialized for particular body functions.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Although the species involved in competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments are shared. Emphasis is on predicting consistent patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships among and between organisms.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-3 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Food webs are models that demonstrate how matter and energy is transferred between producers, consumers, and decomposers as the three groups interact within an ecosystem. Transfers of matter into and out of the physical environment occur at every level. The atoms that make up the organisms in an ecosystem are cycled repeatedly between the living and nonliving parts of the ecosystem.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-6 [ICS page]

Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services

Supporting Content:

Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth's ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem's biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. Changes in biodiversity can influence ecosystem services that humans rely on.

Life Sciences: LS4-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals' probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.

Supporting Content:

Natural selection leads to the predominance of certain traits in a population, and the suppression of others. Emphasis is on using concepts of natural selection in animals, such as overproduction of offspring, passage of time, variation in a population, selection of favorable traits, and heritability of traits.

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