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Nutrition: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

First Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.1.5 [CCSS page]

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Suggested Lesson

Make a list of fruits and a list of vegetables. Remember, all fruits have seeds.

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.3 [CCSS page]

Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

Suggested Lesson

Plan a good meal in a My Choice plate. Cut and glue pictures from a magazine or draw them.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 [CCSS page]

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

Suggested Lesson

Explain in a paragraph why eating correctly is important to your health.

Fifth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.1 [CCSS page]

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.

Suggested Lesson

Explain in a paragraph why people don't eat correctly even when they know how or that they should.

Math

First Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1 [CCSS page]

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Suggested Lesson

Add up how many different fruits and vegetables are offered on your school lunch menu for a week.

Second Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.D.10 [CCSS page]

Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems1 using information presented in a bar graph.

Suggested Lesson

Try some new fruits or vegetables that are not usually served at school. Make a graph showing how many students liked each one.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.NBT.B.4 [CCSS page]

Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Suggested Lesson

Keep track of your meals for a day. Using the internet or another source, determine as closely as possible the calories provided by that day's food. Were you eating the correct amount of calories for your body? Use the chart on this American Heart Association page to determine how many calories you should have.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.6.RP.A.3c [CCSS page]

Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

Suggested Lesson

Gather some common foods eaten by your class. Weight them. Leave them uncovered for a week. Weigh them again. Calculate the percent of the food that evaporated as water during that week. Discuss what relationship the water plays in our health.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1. [ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

Examples of patterns could include that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals. Animals obtain their food from plants or from other animals.

First Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-1-1 [ICS page]

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

All organisms have body parts. Different animals use their body parts in different ways to take in food. Animals have body parts that capture and convey different kinds of information needed for growth and survival. Animals respond to these inputs with behaviors that help them survive.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Supporting Content:

Animals have various body systems with specific functions for sustaining life: skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, muscular, digestive, etc. Examples of structures could include digestive organs such as the stomach.

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants. Some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Emphasis is on the idea that matter that is not food (air, water, decomposed materials in soil) is changed by plants into matter that is food.

Fifth Grade

Physical Sciences: PS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Use models to describe that energy in animals' food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.

Supporting Content:

The energy released from food was once energy from the sun that was captured by plants. Food provides animals with the materials they need for body repair and growth and the energy they need to maintain body warmth and for motion. Examples of models could include diagrams and flow charts.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS1-MS-3 [ICS page]

Use argument supported by evidence for how a living organism is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

Supporting Content:

In multicellular organisms, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues. Tissues form organs that are specialized for particular body functions. Examples could include the interaction of subsystems within a system and the normal functioning of those systems.

Life Sciences: LS1-MS-6 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matters moves through an organism.

Supporting Content:

Within individual organisms, food moves through a series of chemical reactions in which it is broken down and rearranged to form new molecules, to support growth, or to release energy. Emphasis is on describing that molecules are broken apart and put back together and that in this process, energy is released. Elements in the products are the same as the elements in the reactant

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-4 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the flow of energy through the trophic levels of an ecosystem

Supporting Content:

Food webs can be broken down into multiple energy pyramids. Concepts should include the 10% rule of energy.

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