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Satellites: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Third Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.R1.3.1 [CCSS page]

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for answers.

Suggested Lesson:

Read the NASA essay "What Is A Satellite?" designed for grades 3-4. Participate in a classroom discussion about satellites, referring to the text to support discussion points.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.3 [CCSS page]

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

Suggested Lesson:

Taking on the character of a satellite, write a first-person story telling how you got into space and what you do there. You may wish to view this NASA video to help you get started.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.1 [CCSS page]

Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.7 and W.6.8 [CCSS page]

Conduct short research projects to answer a question. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources.

Suggested Lesson:

Research a satellite and write a persuasive argument as to why your satellite should be funded. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. You may want to use The Great Satellite Search from the Exploratorium as a model for this lesson.

Math

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.MD.B.3 [CCSS page]

Solve one - and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs.

Suggested Lesson:

Using an infographic showing the numbers of satellites per country, figure out problems such as these: How many more satellites does the US have than China? How many fewer satellites does Canada have then the US? What is the most common use of satellites, and what is the second greatest use?

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.3 [CCSS page]

Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.

Suggested Lesson:

Using the lesson Fired Up Over Math: Studying Wildfires from Space, utilize satellite data to find the area of wildfires and burn scars.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.6.G.A. [CCSS page]

Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.

Suggested Lesson:

Using the Satellite Solver Challenge, calculate how long it will take an Earth satellite to image the entire planet.

Science

First Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-1-1 [ICS page]

Use observations of the sun, moon, and stars to describe patterns that can be predicted.

Supporting Content:

Patterns of the motion of the sun, moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, and predicted.

Second Grade

Physical Sciences: PS1-2-2 [ICS page]

Analyze data obtained from testing different materials to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for an intended purpose.

Supporting Content:

Examples of properties could include strength, flexibility, hardness, texture, and absorbency. Different properties are suited to different purposes.

Third Grade

Physical Sciences: PS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

Supporting Content:

Each force acts on one particular object and has both strength and a direction. Forces that do not sum to zero can cause changes in the object's speed or direction of motion.


Physical Sciences: PS1-3-2. [ICS page]

Make observations and/or measurements of an object's motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

Supporting Content:

The patterns of an object's motion in various situations can be observed and measured; when that past motion exhibits a regular pattern, future motion can be predicted from it.

Fourth Grade

Physical Sciences: PS1-4-1 [ICS page]

Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object.

Supporting Content:

The faster a given object is moving, the more energy it possesses.


Physical Sciences: PS1-4-4 [ICS page]

Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

Supporting Content:

Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints.) The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria.) Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account.


Physical Sciences: PS2-4-3 [ICS page]

Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

Supporting Content:

Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions. Digitized information can be transmitted over long distances without significant degradation. High-tech devices, such as computers or cell phones, can receive and decode information and vice versa.

Fifth Grade

Physical Sciences: PS1-5-3 [ICS page]

Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

Supporting Content:

Examples of properties could include color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, and solubility.


Physical Sciences: PS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down.

Supporting Content:

The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth's surface pulls that object toward the planet's center.


Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain, and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities have effects on the land, ocean, air, and even outer space. People are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Physical Sciences: PS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Apply Newton's Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.

Supporting Content:

Examples of practical problems could include the impact of collisions between a meteor and a space vehicle.


Physical Sciences: PS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object's motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

Supporting Content:

The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. Emphasis is on balanced and unbalanced forces in a system, qualitative comparisons of forces, mass and changes in motion, frame of reference, and specification of units.


Physical Sciences: PS2-MS-4 [ICS page]

Construct and present arguments using evidence to support the claim that gravitational interactions are attractive and depend on the masses of interacting objects.

Supporting Content:

Gravitational forces are always attractive. There is a gravitational force between any two masses, but it is very small except when one or both of the objects have large mass (such as the Earth and the Sun.) Examples of evidence for arguments could include data generated from digital tools and charts displaying mass, strength of interaction, distance from the Sun, and orbital periods of objects within the solar system.


Physical Sciences: PS4-MS-3 [ICS page]

Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information to support the claim that digitized signals are a more reliable way to encode and transmit information than analog signals.

Supporting Content:

Emphasis is on a basic understanding that waves can be used for communication purposes. Examples could include radio wave pulses and conversion of stored binary patterns to make sound or text on a computer screen. Digitized signals (sent as wave pulses) are a more reliable way to encode and transmit information.


Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-MS-2 [ICS page]

Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.

Supporting Content:

Earth and its solar system are part of the Milky Way galaxy. A solar system consists of a star and a collection of objects, including planets, their moons, and asteroids that are held in orbit around the star by its gravitational pull on them. Emphasis for the model is on gravity as the force that holds together the solar system, and controls orbital motions within them. Evidences of models can be physical (such as computer visualizations of elliptical orbits) or conceptual (such as mathematical proportions relative to the size of familiar objects.)


Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-MS-3 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.

Supporting Content:

Emphasis is on the analysis of data from Earth-based instruments, space-based telescopes, and spacecraft to determine similarities and differences among solar system objects. Examples of scale properties include the sizes of an object's layers, surface features, and orbital radius.

Engineering and Technology Standards Content

All Grades

ETS1.A: Defining Engineering Problems

A situation that people want to change or create can be approached as a problem to be solved through engineering. Such problems may have many acceptable solutions. Asking questions, making observations, and gathering information are helpful in thinking about problems. Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account. The more precisely a design task's criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that is likely to limit possible solution.

ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

Designs can be conveyed through sketches, drawings, or physical models. These representations are useful in communicating ideas for a problem's solutions to other people. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions. A solution needs to be tested, and then modified on the basis of the test results in order to improve it. The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution. There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet criteria and constraints of a problem.

ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution

Because there is always more than one possible solution to a problem, it is useful to compare and test designs. Different solutions need to be tested in order to determine which of them best solves the problem, given the criteria and the constraints.

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