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Weather: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Kindergarten

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.K.4 [CCSS page]

Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.

Suggested Lesson

Discuss the seasons and what kinds of weather are typically found in each. Do you have all of these types of weather where you live?

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.2.1 [CCSS page]

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Suggested Lesson

Using the Beaufort Scale, small groups should work together to determine the strength of the wind and discuss the number they would assign to the wind. Determine if everyone assessed the wind as the same measurement. Why or why not?

Fifth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3 [CCSS page]

Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Suggested Lesson

Read about two related weather topics such as tornadoes & hurricanes, anemometers & the Beaufort Scale, or rain & snow. Write a paragraph explaining the relationships between the two.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.6.6 [CCSS page]

Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Suggested Lesson

Read the following article about the different names assigned to tornadoes around the country. Discuss why this happens. What names are used in your local area? Why do you think that regional changes happen to words? (i.e. pancakes, flapjacks, hotcakes, griddlecakes, etc.)

Math

Kindergarten

CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.B.3 [CCSS page]

Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Suggested Lesson

Sort various weather-related pictures and classify them. Count the pictures. Use this worksheet or some other.

First Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.B.3 [CCSS page]

Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.

Suggested Lesson

Using a weather map, compare the temperatures of various towns in your area for a given day. Discuss which ones were warmer, cooler, and by how much.

Third Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.3.NF.A.3 [CCSS page]

Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.

Suggested Lesson

Rainwater is measured in inches. Using a ruler, measure water in various containers and place them in order from smallest to largest. Does the size of the container matter?

Practice with whole numbers and mixed numbers.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.1 [CCSS page]

Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table.

For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as 1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), . . .

Suggested Lesson

Measure the time it takes for an ice cube to melt at room temperature. At the same time place an ice cube in a refrigerator. When the room temp ice cube has completely mantled, check the one in the refrigerator. Discuss the difference between the two.

Science

Kindergarten

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-1 [ICS page]

Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time, which includes the four seasons.

Supporting Content:

Weather is the combination of sunlight, wind, snow or rain, and temperature in a particular region at a particular time. People measure these conditions to describe and record the weather and to notice patterns over time. The four seasons occur in a specific order due to their weather patterns. Examples of qualitative observations could include descriptions of the weather (such as sunny, cloudy, rainy, and warm); examples of quantitative observations could include numbers of sunny, windy, and rainy days in a month. Examples of patterns could include that it is usually cooler in the morning than in the afternoon and the number of sunny days versus cloudy days in different months.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-[ICS page]

Ask questions to obtain information about the purpose of weather forecasting to prepare for, and respond to, severe weather.

Supporting Content:

Some kinds of severe weather are more likely than others in a given region. Weather scientists forecast severe weather so that the communities can prepare for and respond to these events.

Physical Sciences: PS2-K-2 [ICS page]

Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth's surface.

Supporting Content:

Sunlight warms Earth's surface.

Physical Sciences: PS2-K-2 [ICS page]

Use tools and materials to design and build a structure that will reduce the warming effects of sunlight on an area.

Supporting Content:

Examples of structures could include umbrellas, canopies, and tents that minimize the warming effect of the sun.

First Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-1-1 [ICS page]

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Supporting Content:

Seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset can be observed, described, and predicted. Seasons are created by weather patterns for a particular region and time. Local patterns create four distinct seasons. Emphasis is on relative comparisons of the amount of daylight in the winter to the amount in the spring or fall.

Second Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.

Supporting Content:

Wind and water can change the shape of the land. Examples of solutions could include different designs of dikes and windbreaks to hold back wind and water.

Third Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-3-1 [ICS page]

Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.

Supporting Content:

Scientists record patterns of the weather across different times and areas so that they can make predictions about what kind of weather might happen next. Examples of data could include average temperature, precipitation, and wind direction. Graphical displays could include pictographs and bar graphs.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-3-2 [ICS page]

Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.

Supporting Content:

Climate describes a range of an area's typical weather conditions and the extent to which those conditions vary over years.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-3-1 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.

Supporting Content:

A variety of natural hazards result from natural processes. Humans cannot eliminate natural hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts. Examples of design solutions to weather-related hazards could include barriers to prevent flooding, wind resistant roofs, and lightning rods.

Fourth Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-4-2 [ICS page]

Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.

Supporting Content:

A variety of hazards result from natural process (e.g. flooding). Humans cannot eliminate the hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely conditions.

Fifth Grade

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-5-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

Supporting Content:

Earth's major systems are the geosphere (solid and molten rock, soil, and sediments), the hydrosphere (water and ice), the atmosphere (air), and the biosphere (living things.) These systems interact in multiple ways to affect Earth's surface materials and processes. The ocean influences climate. Mountain ranges influence winds and clouds in the atmosphere. Winds and clouds in the atmosphere interact with the landforms to determine patterns of weather.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-MS-4 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Supporting Content:

Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land. Global movements of water and its changes in form are propelled by sunlight and gravity.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

Supporting Content:

The complex patterns of the changes and the movement of water in the atmosphere, determined by winds, landforms, and ocean temperatures and currents, are major determinants of local weather patterns. Because these patterns are so complex, weather can only be predicted using probability. Emphasis is on how air masses flow from regions of high pressure to low pressures, causing weather (defined by temperature, pressure, humidity, precipitation, and wind) at a fixed location to change over time, and how sudden changes in weather can result when different air masses collide. Emphasis is on how weather can be predicted within probabilistic ranges. Examples of data can be provided (such as weather maps, diagrams, and visualizations) or obtained through laboratory experiments.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-MS-6 [ICS page]

Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

Supporting Content:

The ocean exerts a major influence on weather and climate by absorbing energy from the sun, releasing it over time, and globally redistributing it through ocean currents. Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect atmospheric flow patterns. Emphasis of atmospheric circulation is on the sunlight-driven latitudinal banding, the Coriolis effect, and resulting prevailing winds.

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