Major Funding The Laura Moore Cunningham Foundation



Wetlands: Standards

Idaho Common Core State Standards

Here are correlations to the National Common Core Language and Math standards and to the Idaho State Science Standards. If you'd like, you may go directly to the Idaho science standards for this topic. For more information about the overall standards, see the complete Idaho Content Standards for Science, the Next Generation Science Standards, the Common Core Language standards, or the Common Core Math standards.

Language

Second Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.2.7 [CCSS page]

Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).

Suggested Lesson

Together as a class, research wetlands in general, noting what specifically makes a wetland unique. Create a list of wetland-specific animals, plants, and environments. From that, generate a class diorama of a wetland.

Third Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.7 [CCSS page]

Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).

Suggested Lesson

Visit a local wetland environment as a field trip. Have students create a map of the wetland and label the plants, animals, and other important objects they see in and around the wetland.

Sixth Grade

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.2 [CCSS page]

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Suggested Lesson

Visit the website Give Water a Hand and look over the Guides and project Success Stories. Then have students write up a proposal for selecting a service project to help a wetland in your area. Present the proposals to the class. Students could vote on the best proposal and perform the service project together.

Math

Second Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.A.1 [CCSS page]

Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.

Suggested Lesson

Gather cattails for your class to measure the heads. Label each cattail with a sticker marked A, B, etc. to make sure students have the chance to measure each one.

Third Grade

Multiple standards [CCSS page]

Suggested Lesson

Greenwings offers some real-world contextual problems relating to wetlands that students can solve.

Fourth Grade

CCSS.Math.Content.4.MD.A.2 [CCSS page]

Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

Suggested Lesson

Plants in a wetland actually hold water in the soil. Weigh some common plants before and after watering, for a period of weeks, to determine the average amount of water the roots will hold in the soil. Aim to allow the plant to become as dry as possible without killing it between watering.

Science

Kindergarten

Life Sciences: LS1-K-1[ICS page]

Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.

Supporting Content:

Examples of patterns could include that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals. Animals obtain their food from plants or from other animals.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-K-2 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environments around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-1 [ICS page]

Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.

Supporting Content:

Living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and they live in places that have the things they need. Plants, animals, and their surroundings make up a system.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-K-3 [ICS page]

Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environments.

Supporting Content:

Things that people do to live comfortably can affect the environment around them. But they can make choices that reduce their impacts on the land, water, air, and other living things.

First Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-1-3 [ICS page]

Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Supporting Content:

Reproduction is essential to the continued existence of every kind of organism. Changes animals go through during their life form a pattern.

Second Grade

Life Sciences: LS1-2-1 [ICS page]

Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

Supporting Content:

There are many different kinds of living things in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water. The emphasis is on the diversity of living things in each of a variety of different habitats.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS1-2-1 [ICS page]

Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.

Supporting Content:

Some events happen very quickly; others occur very slowly, over a time period much longer than one can observe.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-2-1 [ICS page]

Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.

Supporting Content:

Water can change the shape of the land. Examples of solutions could include different designs of dikes to hold back water.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-2-3 [ICS page]

Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid, liquid or gas.

Supporting Content:

Water is found in the ocean, rivers, lakes, and ponds.

Third Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-3-2 [ICS page]

Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Supporting Content:

Interactions with the environment affect the characteristics that organisms develop. Some characteristics result from individuals' interactions with the environment.

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Supporting Content:

A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs are met. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Newly introduced species can damage the balance of an ecosystem. Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms and therefore operate as decomposers, eventually recycling some materials back to the soil. Matter cycles between the air and soil and among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die. Organisms obtain gases and water from the environment, and release waste matter (gas, liquid, or solid) back into the environment.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-4-1 [ICS page]

Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.

Supporting Content:

Rainfall helps to shape the land and affects the types of living things found in a region. Water, ice, wind, living organisms, and gravity break rocks, soils, and sediments into smaller particles and move them around. Examples of variables to test could include angle of slope in the downhill movement of water and volume of water flow.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-4-1 [ICS page]

Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

Supporting Content:

Energy and fuels that humans use are derived from natural sources, and their use affects the environment in multiple ways. Examples of environmental effects could include loss of aquatic habitat due to dams.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences: LS2-5-3 [ICS page]

Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Supporting Content:

Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the animals and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

Life Sciences: LS2-5-4 [ICS page]

Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.

Supporting Content:

Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, temperature, food, and other organisms. When the environment changes in ways that affect a place's physical characteristics or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die. Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-5-2 [ICS page]

Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

Supporting Content:

Nearly all of Earth's available water is in the ocean. Most fresh water is in glaciers, polar ice caps, or underground; only a tiny fraction is in rivers, lakes, wetlands, and the atmosphere.

Earth and Space Systems: ESS3-5-1 [ICS page]

Support, obtain, and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth's resources and environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, and air. Individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth's resources and environments.

Sixth Grade/Middle School

Life Sciences: LS1-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.

Supporting Content:

Plants use the energy from light to make sugars (food) from carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and water through the process of photosynthesis, which also releases oxygen.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-1 [ICS page]

Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors. In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction. Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-2 [ICS page]

Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Supporting Content:

Predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments are shared.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-3 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.

Supporting Content:

Emphasis is on describing the conservation of matter and flow of energy into and out of various ecosystems, and on defining the boundaries of the system. Food webs are models that demonstrate how matter and energy is transferred between producers, consumers, and decomposers as the three groups interact within an ecosystem. Transfers of matter into and out of the physical environment occur at every level. Decomposers recycle nutrients from dead plant or animal matter back to the water in aquatic environments.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-5 [ICS page]

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Supporting Content:

Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations. Emphasis is on recognizing patterns in data and making warranted inferences about changes in populations, and on evaluating empirical evidence supporting arguments about changes to ecosystems.

Life Sciences: LS2-MS-6 [ICS page]

Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.

Supporting Content:

Biodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth's terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem's biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health. Changes in biodiversity can influence humans' resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on—for example, water purification. Examples of design solution constraints could include scientific, economic, and social considerations. There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS2-MS-4 [ICS page]

Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth's systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

Supporting Content:

Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land. Movements of water and its changes in form are propelled by sunlight and gravity. Emphasis is on the ways water changes its state as it moves through the multiple pathways of the hydrologic cycle.

Earth and Space Sciences: ESS3-MS-1 [ICS page]

Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth's mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.

Supporting Content:

Resources such as fresh water are limited, and distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes.

Earth and Space Sciences ESS3-MS-3 [ICS page]

Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

Supporting Content:

Human activities can have consequences on the biosphere, sometimes altering natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. Examples of the design process include examining human environmental impacts, assessing the kinds of solutions that are feasible, and designing and evaluating solutions that could reduce that impact. Examples of human impacts can include water usage (such as the withdrawal of water from streams and aquifers or the construction of dams and levees), land usage (such as urban development, agriculture, or the removal of wetlands), and pollution (such as of the air, water, or land).

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